John Hogan (8th April 1884 to 6th October 1943)

 

 

John was born in Royton nearby. Though awarded the Victoria Cross medal his start in the army wasn’t the best. He joined the South Lancashire Regiment aged 18 but was discharged five weeks later with the report saying “Not likely to become an efficient soldier.’  Months later he joined the Manchester Regiment and served in South Africa and India. Returning home he became a postman for two years. However when World War One broke out he re-joined the army.

 

His act of bravery came on 29th October 1914 near Festubert, France. That day the British trench received a surprised stampede by Germans soldiers. Two British soldiers were taken prisoner. John, aged 30, escaped unhurt but didn’t flee. When help arrived they took over the trench, shooting ten German soldiers (eight died) and making sixteen prisoners surrender.

 

The following January he married a widow, Margret Taylor, and then the following month a Victoria Cross was presented to him by King George V at Buckingham Palace (on  display in Oldham Civic Centre. )

 

John lived locally and died aged 59 in Oldham & District Hospital. He did alright for a postman.

 

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Looking for…

 

 

Touching the “VC”…and there it is…

 

 

 

Amid towering gravestones of some wealthy mill owners…

 

hogan pic 4

 

hogan pic 5

 

I noticed this tree pushing the top of a headstone of its stand…